Trump’s Victory

Well, Trump won. Now those of use on the neoreaction need to have a balanced viewpoint of this. Trump’s presidency should provide a political climate more favorable to our movement, but as I have said before, and will repeat again: Trump is an American civic nationalist; ultimately it is the responsibility of the neoreaction and alt-right to encourage ethnonationalism. Trump may keep America alive for a few years longer, but the way demographics are, if persons of European ancestry wish to have a significant presence on the North American continent 200 years from now, an ethnostate of some sort is almost certainly necessary. Now for those of you excited by this victory, I pose the question: is Trump an avatar of the Indo-European 2nd-funtion deity? (from Dumezil’s trifunctional hypothesis) Some images for inspiration below:

Trump vs. Political Correctness
Thor vs. Jormungandr (by Kubeen on Deviant Art)
Indra vs Vritra
Heracles vs. Hydra

And finally:

Bard the Bowman vs Smaug

 

 

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Why Nietzsche? How I See Things

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, Caspar David Fredrich

Those of you who are more familiar with the German philosopher Fredrich Nietzsche may be wondering why an ethnonationalist like myself is blogging about him. It seems common knowledge that Nietzsche was against nationalism, so why do I bother to bring him up?

Update 2/19/2017 I wrote this a while back and may disagree with it to a certain extent.

Continue reading “Why Nietzsche? How I See Things”

Liberalism as a Derivative of Nominalism

I have recently been watching a series of videos explaining the origins of modern Western Liberalism in the Nominalist philosophical movement which emerged in Europe during the High Middle Ages. I will post the videos below. The author of the video series, however, does not explain the possible origins of Nominalism in the anti-Essentialism and anti-intellectualism found in the Bible itself (Gal. 3:28, Prov. 3:7, 1 Cor. 1:25), and how this anti-Essentialism was tempered for a period of time by the Church’s adoption of Hellenic (mostly Platonic and Aristotlean) philosophy, but later let loose by the Sola Scriptura of the Protestant Reformation. This untempered anti-Essentialism, particularly present in Evangelical Protestant Christianity (but also to an extent in Catholicism), appears to be what Nietzsche begins to react against as explained in Part 5.  After watching these you should be able to understand the Nominalist roots of feminism, transgenderism, and race denialism. It should also be clear why political correctness has a much tighter grip on the populace in countries with a historical Protestant presence like America, Canada, Britain, Germany, and Sweden, than more Catholic and Orthodox countries such as Spain, Italy, and most of Eastern Europe including Russia.