Here we go again …

Recently there has been a major comments war on Amerika.org regarding the website moderator’s take on one of my posts which I published a few weeks ago. Dare I import the war onto my own blog? Apparently, I am insane enough to do this.

Do the Irish have “negroid” admixture?

(The following map includes both Sub-Saharan and North African components)

African-admixture

Apparently not [the data for this map gives 0% African admixture to the Irish].

West Asian (Northern Middle Eastern) admixture?

West-Asian-admixture

It is found at low frequencies throughout Northwestern Europe.

Admixture related to Semitic peoples?

Southwest-Asian-admixture

There is a small amount in all Europeans except for a few Eastern Europeans, the Saami, Finns, Basques, and Catalans.

Martian admixture? (someone actually suggested this!)

Give me a break.

So what makes the Irish a little bit different from the English, and pulled slightly in the same direction as Iberians are on a genetic principal component analysis?

A bit more Atlantic admixture (combination of Neolithic farmer and Mesolithic hunter-gatherer) most likely from the Megalithic period is responsible for this. The Irish have more than the English, but the English have some of this admixture as well. It peaks in the Basques, is relatively high in Eastern Iberia and the “Celtic Fringe”, followed by other geographically Western European populations, but is much lower in the Eastern Mediterranean, Near East, and Northern Africa.

Atlantic-admixture

This admixture peaks in the Basque population and appears to be a blend of Near Eastern Neolithic farmers and Mesolithic European Hunter-Gatherers. It matches mostly the extent of the Atlantic Megalithic culture. Several ancient samples were added to GEDMatch and analysed with Eurogenes K15. Nine Megalithic Iberian samples (3211-1518 BCE) had an average Atlantic percentage of 38.8%, similar to modern Basques. Three samples from the Remedello culture in Late Neolithic northern Italy (3483-1773 BCE) scored an average of 35.2%, considerably more than modern Italians, even Sardinians. One Megalithic Irish sample from Ballynahatty had 32.7% of Atlantic, about the same as modern Irish people. (source)

If you don’t like these admixture maps, then go argue with Maciamo Hay on Eupedia about them. I have my own life to live.

 

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On Irish Genetics

There has been some dispute caused by uninformed persons on the dissident Right (not naming any names Amerika .org) regarding the nature of Irish ancestry. I will attempt to clarify this as much as possible.

About two years ago, some British newspaper headlines written by people who seem to know very little about population genetics implied that the Irish are Middle Eastern (here, here). They are only correct in that all extant Europeans, Irish included, have significant admixture from early Neolithic Anatolian farmers. However, in order to correctly understand European genetics, one must do more than reading newspaper headlines. If the bozos who wrote them had actually read through the study they were basing their claims on, and understood its significance in the context of current population genetics, then they would realize that the Irish are essentially Northwestern Europeans (but that doesn’t make for a good eye-catching sensationalist story, now, does it).

The Irish genetically cluster and overlap to a significant degree with other Northwestern European samples, and appear most closely related to the British. They are not Southern Europeans, genetically speaking. Here are principal component analyses from two separate studies showing this. In the second analysis, the Irish are practically indistinguishable from the British and also overlap with Norwegians and Dutch.

Source

 

Large image of Figure 1.
source

Even if one wishes to do a fine-scale analysis to reveal the genetic difference between the English and the Irish, there is still obvious genetic overlap, and the English themselves have some Insular Celtic (Irish related) ancestry in addition to Anglo-Saxon ancestry.

Figure 3
Source In this case “Roman” refers to indigenous Britons living in the Roman era.

The Irish and all Insular Celts appear to owe the vast majority of Y-chromosomes (haplogroup R-L21), as well as their autosomal ancestry to Bronze Age inhabitants of the British Isles c. 2000-1500 BC (link). The figure below shows the varying affinities of prehistoric Irish and Hungarian genomes towards modern European populations. (The fact that the Neolithic Irish sample resembles modern southern Europeans does not mean that the modern Irish are Southern European, rather all genetic samples from the Neolithic in Western and Central Europe prior to the Indo-European expansion resemble those of southern Europeans, particularly Sardinians; see the analysis at the bottom of the page).

Fig. 3.
source

The Bronze Age Irish, from whom modern Irish are descended, were autosomally very close to contemporaneous Indo-European peoples in Scandinavia (Nordic Bronze Age), and the continent (Unetice culture) (see analysis below). This is the reason why the Irish to this day are genetically Northwestern Europeans, just as the British, Germans and Scandinavians are. The cause of genetic variation between these groups is not that one group possesses a type of admixture that the others do not; it is because of small variations in the proportions of Neolithic farmer, hunter-gatherer, and Steppe related admixtures.

source study