A Contemporary Allegory of the Three Estates of the Realm

 

In this post I will present an allegory of the three estates of the realm, using material which is totally unrelated to NRx. Out of respect for my more socially conservative readers, I warn you that I will be referring to some things that may be a bit uncomfortable for you to think about; so you may want to skip reading this post if you are not feeling particularly adventuresome.

I will follow the model of the three estates of the realm as it is presented on the blog Poseidon Awoke: Realist. The first estate, the religious priesthood, is considered to have the qualities of femininity, short-term outlook, and coercion with speech. The second estate, the warrior-aristocrats, is considered to have the qualities of masculinity, a long-term outlook, and coercion with force. The third estate, the free commoners, is considered to have the qualities of being evolutionary, having a mid-term outlook, and coercion using remuneration. These three estates are easily traceable back to the three functions of Indo-European society: 1. Sovereignty, 2. Military, and 3. Productivity identified by Georges Dumézil.

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The Pitfall of Leftist National Socialism

I think that I have made it rather clear to those who read my blog that I am not a fascist, and I will also say that I am not a National Socialist, however, being a member of the non-mainstream right, I am bound to get exposed to various strange viewpoints which pop up all over the web. One such viewpoint is expressed at Aryanism.net, a leftist National Socialist website which, if you check it out, (seemingly) successfully argues that National Socialist Germany was in fact not a mono-ethnic state, but (in its own weird way) a morally, and biologically idealistic state, which was permissive of immigration of some persons of non-German ethnicity. Ethnic nationalism is condemned on this site as tribalistic “non-Aryan” behavior. I really don’t know if these people present an accurate picture of German National Socialism or not, and I don’t have time to research that. Perhaps the only thoughts I completely agree with on that website are those regarding the origin of certain modern phenotypes in early Neolithic agricultural societies, such as in China, Persia, the Mediterranean, Egypt, etc, which then spread out into many parts of the world. This view of recent genetic history is supported by a recent study by the somewhat well-known geneticist Iosif Lazaridis.

The other important points I agree with regarding this website is their aesthetic ideals regarding the human body and the importance of various distinctly evolved phenotypes, which can have implications for the purpose of nation building in specific geographic areas (see their page here). I also seem to agree with these people that “Religions based on the premise of perfection attainable through struggle” are good and necessary, however, I see this more from a Nietzschean master morality viewpoint, whereas these National Socialists see it from a Christian slave-moral viewpoint.

The aesthetic idealism I previously mentioned is important in a Nietzschean frame of mind, where an aesthetic phenomenon is seen as the justification for existence and the world, thus averting the nihilism and the existential crisis consequent from the “death of God”. You can watch the following video below to find out more about this idea.

My main criticism, however, of the ideology promoted by these National Socialists is their desire, even their thought, that human reproduction can, and should be limited to an extreme. They claim that an Aryan is one who rejects enslavement, and yet enslavement to a totalitarian governmental system is what they desire to solve all of the world’s problems. They, perhaps correctly, see tribalism as a result of competition over limited resources, and they seek to end this through a severe limit on reproduction, but living under such a regime is certainly free for no one, no matter how pleasing it might be. While it might make an aesthetic ideal achievable, it would essentially turn everyone into non-autonomous livestock under an autocratic dictator. No one is permitted under such a regime to grasp the sweet fruit of master morality, rendering such and ideology useless in a Nietzschean struggle towards the Ubermensch.

Now, I did find an interesting book synthesizing Nietzschean and Buddhist thought,  which perhaps reveals the reasons why Nietzschean Ubermensch-like behavior, as I have previously stated in other posts, can be found in the Japanese anime character of Haruka Nanase, whose conception was ultimately in a culture heavily influenced by Buddhism and Confucianism. A synthesis of Nietzsche and Buddha may ultimately be the answer to modern nihilism, and the existential crises we are bound to face in a rootless secular world.

The Ubermensch as an Archetype

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The Ubermensch or Superman of Nietzche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra appears as a goal towards which humans in their present state are supposed to evolve. However, I suggest that the Ubermensch is something much more deeply embedded in the human consciousness. It is literally the goal that we internally understand we must evolve towards, an archetype which reappears over and over again. A video I link to here briefly summarizes Nietzsche’s Ubermensch as having the qualities of the self-creation of values, independently thinking, strategic selfishness, pagan values, lack of resentment of other’s success, acceptance of suffering, recognizing their strength have gentleness towards the weak, and delight in their own abilities. Watching this video does not replace reading Nietzsche, of course, and there are other minor characteristics of the Ubermensch which I have not listed here, but the ones I have listed are sufficient to show, in the following examples, that the Ubermensch is not just a reality we are destined towards, but some innate, perhaps divine, idea implanted in our consciousness guiding us to become who we are.

Let us first take for example self-creation of values, which is a recurring theme of Nietzsche’s worldview. We should all consider the fact that none of us are truly free until we grasp the self-creation of values. This is perhaps the centerpiece of a (dare I say) Aryan (i.e. free or noble) worldview. It can clearly be seen in the character of Thranduil from The Hobbit, whose values are not swayed by the opinion of others. Instead, he independently forms opinions regarding the situations and persons he comes in contact with.

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Thranduil’s self-creation of values remains a constant theme from his imprisonment of Thorin to his declaration of war on Erebor, and eventual respect for the deceased dwarf Kili. Over the course of the entire narrative, however, this self-creation of values usually manifests itself through another characteristic of the Ubermenschstrategic selfishness. Thranduil is selfish, but not in a rash, unorganized manner. He systematically uses his own power to prevent Thorin from entering Erebor and obtaining gems which belong to him (see this video). Once Thorin manages to enter, he strategically attempts to reclaim his gems in the mountain through trading the Arkenstone (which fails). Then when orcs attack Erebor, and he must ally with the dwarves, after much futile fighting he wishes to recall his forces from the battle and let the dwarves die to save the blood of his elven kin. However, Thranduil also has a compassionate side; his gentleness towards the weak, in fact, appears twice; first, when he supplies the impoverished former residents of Laketown with food, and when he comforts Tauriel after the death of Kili. Thranduil also seems to delight in his own abilities; his skill at sword fighting is superhuman, and one almost gets the sense that he enjoys slicing the heads off of orcs.

To match this, his speech is almost always poetic and has the same well-honed effect of his physical sword. It is clear from these attributes that Thranduil and perhaps many other elves who show similar qualities at times (all elves are by nature superhuman), such as Galadriel, are outward manifestations of the Ubermensch, a deeply buried archetype, which is here expressed through Tolkien, and the film contributors associated with Peter Jackson.

The archetype of the Nietzschean Ubermensch does not only spring up in Western, Indo-European cultures, however. An example from Japanese anime, Haruka Nanase (Haru) of Free! , exemplifies many of the attributes of this archetype. Like Thranduil, Haru constantly exercises the self-creation of values. From the time he is a child he insists on only swimming free and continues to resist being held to external standards up to the time that he takes up swimming as a career. He clearly lacks the strategic selfishness of Thranduil, and this helps to make the character more ‘cute’ and child-like. However, he exceeds Thranduil at not resenting the success of others. Thranduil is obviously resentful of Thorin’s power, yet Haru is never resentful of the success of his rival Rin Matsuoka. Even when Rin beats Haru in a race and brags about it to Haru’s face saying he will never have to swim with Haru again, Haru does not become angry or resentful. Instead, he is very calm and controlled, and thus amazingly exemplifies one of the softer qualities of the Ubermensch, gentleness towards the weak. Later when Rin’s unstable psychological state causes him to swim very poorly in a race, Haru recognizes the emotional weakness within Rin and does what he can to help Rin overcome his emotional burden by inviting Rin (against the rules) to swim in a  relay with him.

Haru also shows some traces of pagan values in his personality, for instance, he has an animistic view of the water in which he swims, and wishes to interact with it as though it were a conscious entity. Pagan values are a recurring theme in Free!, being set in Japan, where Shintoism is a strong part of the culture.

If you watch all the episodes of Free! including the movie Starting Days it seems clear that Haru’s persona as a “superman” is quite evident to the other characters. One character in Starting Days, Asahi Shiina, is so impressed with Haru’s talent at swimming that he even has trouble believing that Haru is a normal human, capable of dying if someone tried to kill him, until one day Haru passes out from low blood sugar. Another character in this movie, Ikuya Kirishima, seems to see Haru as an Ubermensch in much the same way I describe the archetype here, as someone to emulate, or a “guide” or blueprint for the development of a more advanced self.

There are many more manifestations of the Ubermensch as an archetype than the ones I have described above. These two, however, demonstrate the somewhat universal, cross-cultural, nature of this archetype, which dwells in the depths of our consciousness, constantly pushing us, and our biological kin, towards arete, excellence in every sense possible. Thus, though Nietzsche proclaimed “God is dead”, he seems to have supplied us with an eternal God, as real as the evolution of life in the universe, and the universe itself.

Does Haru Fall? (Nietzschean Interperetation of Free!)

Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, Thomas Cole

A few days ago I published a blog post asserting that Haruka Nanase of the anime series Free! is a type of ubermensch who exhibits master morality. This indeed seems to be the case through most of the series. From his childhood, he insisted on swimming “free” and not being bound by the value judgment of society on his ability to swim. However, by episode 13 of the Eternal Summer season, he decides to take up swimming as a career and openly (to his friends) is willing to swim in keeping with the value judgment of his society on his swimming (times, competition, etc.). To me, this seemed like something of a tragedy. It is as though Haru loses who he is. The character that we have come to know seems to have changed unalterably at the last moment in the series. From a Nietzschean viewpoint, he loses his role as a master, a creator of values, and takes up the role of the slave, one who adheres to the values of the master.

Haru in Episode 13 of Free! Eternal Summer

This led me to think — are more of us Nietzschean “masters” in childhood, and we become slaves as we teach ourselves to adhere to, and to accept the value judgments our society places upon us as we grow into adulthood? This appears to be something which Haru does, and to me, it is reminiscent of a sort of “fall”, not the same as the Christian “fall”, but equally disastrous from a Nietzschean viewpoint. I encourage my readers to reflect on this and to consider how much of our behavior, and even inward thoughts is controlled(policed) as adults, and how difficult it is to openly express, or even form value judgments dissonant with what society deems acceptable.

If you wish to understand master and slave morality better, especially as it applies to this context, this video can help:

 

 

 

Moral Instruction

Well, it seems that my post on Nominalism and liberalism has not been of much interest to anyone yet, so I have decided to write about something some people might find less intellectually demanding: morality. I previously stated in my first post that what Nietzsche called slave morality needs to decline in order for the West to have any backbone (and to prevent the extinction of ethnic European peoples). I still hold to this idea. In this post I will give one example of how one might find good moral instruction in a source some might find unlikely: anime.

As I began to get deeper and deeper into the broader nonreactionary movement, I began to encounter a mild fanaticism related to anime, particularly in the alt-right. Of course there was one mainstream Republican news reporter who mocked the alt-right back in January of this year calling it a movement of “childless single men who masturbate to anime”(I don’t actually know if Rick Wilson’s claim is entirely false!).

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