Adapting Christianity

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On a Conciliatory Approach Towards Christianity

J.R.R. Tolkien, a very gifted Christian

Nick B. Steves on Social Matter pointed out that I had presented a “cardboard cut out” of Christianity, and since I have admiration for certain Christians, and certain elements of traditionalist Christianity, I have decided to write a blog post on this topic. I experienced Christianity first as the Methodism of my parents. During adolescenthood I became a very serious evangelical for three years. Then, for about a year I experimented with traditional, conservative Anglicanism, after which I decided to leave Christianity alone. I have also researched plenty of information about Catholic and Orthodox denominations of Christianity, including the various ecumenical councils. Although I may not have experienced all forms of Christianity, I may not be as ignorant as I outwardly seem.

Continue reading “On a Conciliatory Approach Towards Christianity”

Liberalism as a Derivative of Nominalism

I have recently been watching a series of videos explaining the origins of modern Western Liberalism in the Nominalist philosophical movement which emerged in Europe during the High Middle Ages. I will post the videos below. The author of the video series, however, does not explain the possible origins of Nominalism in the anti-Essentialism and anti-intellectualism found in the Bible itself (Gal. 3:28, Prov. 3:7, 1 Cor. 1:25), and how this anti-Essentialism was tempered for a period of time by the Church’s adoption of Hellenic (mostly Platonic and Aristotlean) philosophy, but later let loose by the Sola Scriptura of the Protestant Reformation. This untempered anti-Essentialism, particularly present in Evangelical Protestant Christianity (but also to an extent in Catholicism), appears to be what Nietzsche begins to react against as explained in Part 5.  After watching these you should be able to understand the Nominalist roots of feminism, transgenderism, and race denialism. It should also be clear why political correctness has a much tighter grip on the populace in countries with a historical Protestant presence like America, Canada, Britain, Germany, and Sweden, than more Catholic and Orthodox countries such as Spain, Italy, and most of Eastern Europe including Russia.